Thyme

Fig Newtons

by Thyme Recipes 20 Jan 18

Fig Newtons

Inspired by Thyme Travel adventures in Puglia, we thought a figgy recipe would be perfect for January.  You may well have dried figs left in the cupboard after Christmas and this is a lovely, traditional way to use them.  It ought to bring a little nostalgic smile to the faces of tea-time guests too. Created in 1891 by an Ohio born cookie maker, they are named after the Massachusetts town of Newton; their soft exterior and sticky filling an interesting contrast to their crisper cousins.  We have put an Italian twist on the recipe, constructing them as you might a “Raviole di san Giuseppe” (soft Italian biscuits filled with plum jam), but if you want to create the traditional shape simply cut the pastry in half and roll into a long rectangle. Cut in half down the length and place the filling down the centre, brush down each side with some water. Place the second rectangle of pastry on top and pinch the wings of pastry together firmly, before cutting into squares ... but we think they are much prettier in the form of ravioli parcels and it keeps the moist sticky filling inside.

Makes 16

Ingredients

For the pastry:

For the fig newtons:

Method

For the pastry:

  1. Tip the flour, salt and sugar into a food processor.  Pulse, then add the diced butter and pulse until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs.
  2. Add the beaten egg and pulse until the mixture comes together in a ball.  You may need to add a splash of water.
  3. Remove the dough, wrap it in clingfilm and leave to rest in the fridge for 30mins.

For the fig newtons:

  1. Chop the figs and the place them in the pot with the orange zest and juice, the spices and the sherry.
  2. Cook with the lid on until the figs have plumped up and taken in the moisture from the pot. Add in the rest of the ingredients and mix well. If the mix is too stiff, you can loosen it a bit with the syrup from the ginger or if you feel it needs it, more sherry!
  3. Roll the pastry to 5mm and cut the biscuits with a glass or a round biscuit cutter (5-6 cm in diameter).
  4. Place a spoonful of filling in each round and fold to form a half moon, sealing with water.
  5. Place on a baking sheet and bake at 180°C for 8-10 mins or until the pastry is starting to turn a lovely golden colour.
  6. Move to a wire rack to cool. They will store well in a sealed container for a few days at least.
  7. Dust with icing sugar to serve.